Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘libraries’

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so we’re borrowing the concept of Armchair BEA for this Armchair ALA post!

NetGalley loves librarians, and we’re grateful for the support you’ve shown us! Our librarian membership has grown significantly over the past year, and now is the second largest segment of our community (after reviewers/bloggers). Earlier this year we conducted a survey of the librarians using NetGalley, and found some interesting stats.

Our NetGalley at the Library initiative began following our partnership with the American Library Association. If you’re an ALA member, be sure to include your ALA number in your NetGalley profile (My Profile/Account Information) so publishers will see the ALA icon appear when you request titles. Publishers have told us that librarians with that ALA icon are approved more quickly and often. And be sure to sign up for our NetGalley at the Library newsletters here!

We’re also so excited to be working with EarlyWord and Penguin on First Flights: The Penguin Debut Author Program. There’s still time to join and get a copy of City of Women by David R. Gillham from NetGalley!

But now onto ALA Annual. This year, we’re sad to not be attending the show ourselves, and figured some of you librarians might be feeling the same. We’re hoping this Armchair ALA post will serve as a connection point between those of us at home and those of you at the show. So, spread the word via Twitter (#ArmchairALA), and for those of you lucky librarians who are in Anaheim, share the wealth and give us the inside scoop in the Comments section below! Which authors did you meet, which publishers had the best giveaways or beautiful booths, and what titles are you most excited about?

We’ve compiled a list of titles you won’t want to miss–either at the show or from the comfort of your own chairs courtesy of NetGalley.

Click to view our NetGalley Roundup: ALA Annual Preview Edition!

Have you seen Library Journal‘s exclusive 2012 ALA Galley & Signing Guide from PrePub Alert editor Barbara Hoffert? The guide notes whether titles listed are available via NetGalley. Sign up now, and as soon as it’s published, you’ll receive an email containing LJ’s insider’s guide to the most promising new titles coming to ALA Annual in Anaheim. Don’t miss out on this essential roadmap helping library professionals navigate the biggest show of the year! Plus, you’ll see embedded icons that will guide you to NetGalleyso you can request a copy even if you won’t be at the show.

Happy reading,

Lindsey

Digital Concierge, NetGalley

Read Full Post »

We’re excited to announce “Librarian Voices” — a new feature as part of our NetGalley at the Library initiative!

This first “Librarian Voices” post is by Marlene Harris of Reading Reality. Enjoy!
Marlene Harris Librarian Voices

Notable Books and Advance Galleys: It’s so much fun to say “We knew you when”

It can be fun to look at someone famous and say “I knew you when…”, particularly when that “someone” is a book, and the “when” in question is waaaay back before that book came out, and no one knew the book was going to be as hot as it turned out to be.

Or when you’re looking at the ALA Notable List, and remembering when you picked up the ARC at a conference, or got the egalley from NetGalley, because you thought it might be good, and, lo and behold, there it is, an award-winner.

Sometimes, you read a book, and you know it’s special. Then you tell everyone you know until they’re sick of it, and you. Unless you’re very lucky, and it’s your job to help people find their next perfect read.

The ALA Notable Books List is always interesting and useful, because as soon as I see it, I look at it and go, “oh, that one was popular”, “oh, that’s an interesting choice”, or “mmm, I can see why that got picked.” In collection development, it always made for a list of titles to check, but they were usually ones the library already owned. We’d miss one sometimes, especially on the poetry portion of the list!

Maybe it’s because I’m  personally a genre fiction reader, but the ALA Notable Books List always seemed like the “big books” list, Not big in the sense that they’re long books, but big in the sense that they’re literary, at least on the fiction side. These are “important” books, even when they are also very, very popular. Tea Obreht’s  The Tiger’s Wife was one book that we just couldn’t get copies of fast enough. I remember seeing it in NetGalley before the pub date, and I wish I had snagged it then! Then I would have known in advance it was going to be big!

There’s another ALA list, one that reflects what people read for pleasure, instead of the important books. It’s The Reading List that RUSA CODES publishes. This list has categories for genres like “Science Fiction” and “Mystery” and “Romance”, you know, the good stuff. (I’ve never been so sure about that “Adrenaline” category.)

Genre fiction sells, and genre fiction circulates. That’s what circulation statistics show, and publishing numbers and everything else. The books on this list are the ones that people will enjoy.

And they’re fun.

The trick for librarians is picking out which one, or ten, are going to stand out from the crowd. It’s hard because the genre field is crowded and very diverse. Each genre can feel like its own little planet, and the galaxies can seem light-years apart. Lists like this are great navigational tools.

Each title on the fantasy list this year is absolutely marvelous. One of my favorite books of the year, The Magician King by Lev Grossman, is on the short list. The short list! It’s not even the winner! I knew when opened the first page of that egalley from NetGalley that it was going to be one of the big books of the year. But as far the winning title is concerned, as soon as I saw the NetGalley description for this title, it was clear that Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus was something special.  The circus arrives and it brings magic.

On the 2012 list, one of the shortlisted titles in the romance category is Kristan Higgins’ My One and Only. I resisted the impulse to get an egalley last year, but Higgins new book, Somebody to Love, is available now. And I have an egalley from NetGalley.

Maybe Somebody to Love will be on the RUSA CODES Reading List in 2013. And I’ll be able to say that “I knew it when…”

Marlene’s library credentials include an MLS from the University of Kentucky (Go Wildcats!) and over 20 years experience in collection development in public and academic libraries around the U.S; from Chicago to Alaska to Florida. For the past year Marlene has been a consultant and blogger at Reading Reality, where she reviews all the genre fiction she can find, and advocates for ebooks only publishing through her Ebook Review Central feature every Monday. Carina and Dreamspinner, two NetGalley clients, are among the regularly featured publishers. Marlene is also a reviewer for Library Journal.

Read Full Post »

Thank you to the 1,200+ librarians who took our survey in December and January. I’m excited to share the results! This survey asked librarians about their adoption of digital reading devices, how they use digital galleys, and their primary sources for discovering new titles.

Take a look at the press release and check out the detailed results, below:

Results are based on a survey of 1,286 NetGalley librarian members and were collected from December 1, 2011 through February 7, 2012. 59% of librarians surveyed primarily use NetGalley to purchase new titles for their library, and the remainder use it to find new titles to recommend to patrons. Nearly 100 librarians wrote in to point out that they use NetGalley for both purposes.

*overlap occurs

*Publishers, remember that you can link to your title in the NetGalley catalog or allow auto-approval in any online advertising or marketing that you do!

**Publishers, this suggests that there’s a huge growth opportunity to pitch NetGalleys directly to librarians either through NetGalley’s marketing programs (NetGalley at the Library and Feed Your Reader), or using the widget in your own campaigns.

**Librarians, include your institutional email address in your NetGalley Contact Information and Public Bio so publishers know where to reach you!

*Publishers, don’t forget to add urls and use the Digital Press Kit to drive traffic to websites and direct readers to your marketing assets.

*ALA members, be sure you’ve added your ALA number to your NetGalley profile so publishers will see you’re part of the organization. More info is here.

A note on methods: The survey was open to NetGalley members and non-members alike, and was posted via Twitter (@NetGalley), Facebook.com/NetGalley, Direct Email, and re-posted by Library Journal. Results were collected between December 1, 2011 and February 7, 2012.

Thank you, also, to these librarians who had such wonderful things to say about NetGalley!

“I purchase 95 % of what I read on NetGalley. Great books.” –Kathy Spielman, Yorba Linda Middle School Library

“I use it to strengthen my case when recommending titles for purchase AND to look for books that would be good candidates for book clubs.” –Janet Lockhart, West Regional Library

“I use [NetGalley] for two purposes. As a librarian, I use it to find books and authors for the library collection. As a member of the New Mexico Library Association’s committee for our state children’s choice award, I use NetGalley to find exciting new books to nominate for the Land of Enchantment Book Award. We nominate about 30 titles per year, of which three are chosen for an award.” –Beth Nieman, Carlsbad Public Library

“It is so nice to be able to pick and choose the galleys I want to look at rather than getting a big old box, taking the two that I want, and having to dispose of the rest.”— Marea Black, Phoenix Public Library

“I use your emails religiously to find new and interesting titles to order, and recommend. I *love* getting emails about available titles and always look at the titles/publishers.”—Gina Robertson, Gardendale Public Library

“I love this service! It has really helped me decide what items to order in a time of financial problems.”—Jennifer Johnson-Spence, Cooke County Library

“[I] love being able to read books in advance and be able to talk about them with patrons when they come out. Also makes it easier to read new and different authors.”—Sharon A. Redfern , Rockville Public Library

Read Full Post »

On today’s #FollowReader Twittersation, we’ll be joined by Heather McCormack (@HMcCormack), Book Review Editor of Library Journal. Heather’s article (“Patrons Are Consumers, and Consumers Are Patrons; or, How Publishers Can Learn To Stop Worrying and Love Libraries Again”) on the Tools of Change blog has become a jumping off point for a larger discussion about how publishers and libraries can work together and create a win/win for everyone — including readers!

Among questions we will address:

  • Do libraries provide marketing opportunities for publishers, or are they siphoning away potential book buyers?
  • Should ebooks be treated differently than paper books when it comes to library lending?
  • Is it a good idea for U.S. libraries to go to a system such as that in the U.K., where micro-royalties are paid to publishers for each lent title?
  • Would the “Brigadoon Library,” (required reading! click on that link and go read Tim’s article – it’s chock full of interesting ideas and good information on the library/publisher relationship) as proposed by Tim Spalding (@librarythingTim) of Library Thing. Also go and read this handy list that Tim compiled.

I encourage everyone: readers, publishers, librarians, those who have an interest in the industry, to join in the conversation tomorrow. Should be interesting.

To join the #followreader conversation, here’s what to do:

  1. Just before 4pm ET today,  log in to Twitter or whatever interface you prefer. (We recommend Tweetchat, which refreshes quickly and automatically loads your hashtag when you are in the discussion.)
  2. To follow the discussion, run a search for #followreader
  3. I’ll start by asking a few questions, before opening up the discussion to the group.
  4. To post a comment to the discussion, make sure that the hashtag #followreader is in each tweet you write.

Read Full Post »

As National Library Week comes to a close amidst less than celebratory news of threats to community and school libraries, and a somewhat sobering “State of America’s Libraries Report 2010” (summary: “Recession drives more Americans to libraries in search of employment resources; but funding lags demand.”), now seemed the perfect time to have a Bookish Tweeps Virtual Town Hall about how important libraries are, and what we can do to make sure they get the love they need.

No guest this week – or, I should say — you all are the special guests. Come armed with information and opinions. As always, I will try my best to guide the conversation, and maybe we can make a difference. (Or at least motivate one another to do so).

To join the #followreader conversation, here’s what to do:

  1. Just before 4pm ET today,  log in to Twitter or whatever interface you prefer. (We recommend Tweetchat, which refreshes quickly and automatically loads your hashtag when you are in the discussion.)
  2. To follow the discussion, run a search for #followreader
  3. I’ll start by asking a few questions, before opening up the discussion to the group.
  4. To post a comment to the discussion, make sure that the hashtag #followreader is in each tweet you write.

Read Full Post »

OK, sounds dramatic, but trust me, mark down October 19, 2009 as a day to remember.

ia logo

Rarely, in my career have I been “blown away” by a demonstration.  Tonight, “blown away” doesn’t even begin to describe it.  I should have seen it coming, but, I didn’t.  I was completely blindsided.  I was blindsided by the vision of Brewster Kahle, the raw brilliance of his team, and the entire group of individuals and companies who played a role in Brewster’s “convocation”.

Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle

What I saw, was many of the dreams and visions of e-book aficionados everywhere becoming a demonstrable reality tonight.  I say ‘demonstrable’, because by Brewster’s own admission, it’s not ready for prime time, but the demonstration was enough to make my head spin with the possibilities.  But you don’t really want to know that, so let me do my best to just report what I saw.

Let’s start from the beginning…

Tonight, Brewster Kahle, Internet Archive Founder and Chief Librarian, introduced what he calls his “BookServer” project.  BookServer is a framework of tools and activities. It is an open-architectured set of tools that allow for the discoverability, distribution, and delivery of electronic books by retailers, librarians, and aggregators, all in a way that makes for a very easy and satisfying experience for the reader, on whatever device they want.

Now that may sound fairly innocuous, but let me try to walk through what was announced, and demonstrated  (Please forgive me if some names or sequences are wrong, I’m trying to do this all from memory):

  • Brewster announced that the number of books scanned at libraries all over the world has increased over the past year from 1 million books to 1.6 million books.
  • He then announced that all of these 1.6 million books were available in the ePub format, making them accessible via Stanza on the iPhone, on Sony Readers, and many other reading devices in a way that allows the text to re-flow if the font has been changed.
  • Next he announced that not only were these files available in ePub form, but that they were available in the “Daisy” format as well.  Daisy is the format used to create Braille and Text to Speech software interpretations of the work.
  • There were other statistics he cited related to other mediums such as 100,000 hours of TV recordings, 400,000 music recordings, and 15 billion (yes it’s a ‘b’) web pages that have been archived.
  • He then choreographed a series of demonstrations.  Raj Kumar from Internet Archive demonstrated how the BookServer technology can deliver books  to the OLPC (One Laptop per Child) XO laptop, wirelessly.  There are 1 million of these machines in the hands of underprivileged children around the world, and today they just got access to 1.6 million new books.
  • Michael Ang of IA then demonstrated how a title in the Internet Archive which was available in the MOBI format could be downloaded to a Kindle – from outside the Kindle store – and then read on the Kindle.  Because many of these titles were in the Mobi format as well, Kindle readers everywhere also have access to IA’s vast database.
  • Next up, Mike McCabe of IA, came up and demonstrated how files in the Daisy format could be downloaded to a PC then downloaded to a device from Humana, specifically designed for the reading impaired.  The device used Text-to-speech technology to deliver the content, but what was most amazing about this device was the unprecedented ease at which a sight impaired person could navigate around a book, moving from chapter to chapter, or to specific pages in the text.
  • Brewster took a break from the demonstrations  to elaborate a couple of facts, the most significant of which was the fact the books in the worlds libraries fall into 3 categories. The first category is public domain, which accounts for 20% of the total titles out there – these are the titles being scanned by IA.  The second category is books that are in print and still commercially viable, these account for 10% of the volumes in the world’s libraries.  The last category are books that are “out of print” but still in copyright.  These account for 70% of the titles, and Brewster called this massive amount of information the “dead zone” of publishing.  Many of these are the orphan titles that we’ve heard so much about related to the Google Book Settlement – where no one even knows how to contact the copyright holder.  (To all of my friends in publishing, if you let these statistics sink in for a minute, your head will start to spin).
  • Brewster went on to talk about how for any digital ecosystem to thrive, it must support not just the free availability of information, but also the ability for a consumer to purchase, or borrow books as well.
  • At this point, Michael came back out and demonstrated – using the bookserver technology – the purchase of a title from O’Reilly on the Stanza reader on the iPhone – direct from O’Reilly – not from Stanza.  If you are a reader, you may think that there is nothing too staggering about that, but if you are a publisher, this is pretty amazing stuff.  Stanza is supporting the bookserver technology, and supporting the purchase of products direct from publishers or any other retailer using their technology as a delivery platform.  (Again, friends in publishing, give that one a minute to sink in.)
  • The last demonstration was not a new one to me, but Raj came back on and he and Brewster demonstrated how using the Adobe ACS4 server technology, digital books can be borrowed, and protected from being over borrowed from libraries everywhere.  First Brewster demonstrated the borrowing process, and then Raj tried to borrow the same book but found he couldn’t because it was already checked out.  In a tip of the hat to Sony, Brewster then downloaded his borrowed text to his Sony Reader.  This model protects the practice of libraries buying copies of books from publishers, and only loaning out what they have to loan. (Contrary to many publishers fears that it’s too easy to “loan” unlimited copies of e-Books from libraries).
  • In the last piece of the night’s presentation, Brewster asked many of the people involved in this project to come up and say a few words about why they were here, and what motivated them to be part of the project.  The sheer number of folks that came out were as impressive as the different constituencies they represented.  By the end of this the stage was full of people, including some I know, like Liza Daly (Three Press), Mike Tamblyn (Shortcovers), and Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly).  Others, I didn’t know included Hadrien Gradeur (Feedbooks), the woman who invented the original screen for the OLPC, a published author, a librarian from the University of Toronto, Cartwright Reed from Ingram, and a representative from Adobe.

After the night was over, I walked all the way back to the Marina district where I was staying.  The opportunities and implications of the night just absolutely made my head spin.  I am completely humbled to be asked to be here and to witness this event.

In one fell swoop, the Internet Archive expanded the availability of books to millions of people who never had access before, bringing knowledge to places that had never had it.  Who knows what new markets that will create, or more importantly what new minds will contribute to our collective wisdom as a result of that access.  In the same motion, Brewster demonstrated a world where free can coexist with the library borrowing model, and with the commercial marketplace.  Protecting the interests of both of those important constituencies in this ecosystem.  He also, in the smoothest of ways, portrayed every ‘closed system’ including our big retail friends and search engine giants, as small potatoes.

I will have to post again about the implications of all this, but people smarter than me – many of whom I was able to meet today, will be far more articulate about what just happened.  I’m still too blown away.  I know this, it was a ‘game changer’ day.  It may take a couple of years to come to full fruition, but we will be able to pinpoint the spot in history when it was all shown to be possible.  I need to thank Peter Brantley for inviting (or should I say tempting) me to be there. Wow.

Read Full Post »

digital librarianFor last week’s #FollowReader Twitchat, we were honored to be joined by Kathy Ishizuka of School Library Journal, and Shayera Tangri of the Los Angeles public library system.

Our topic of conversation was: Libraries in the Digital Age. And questions and comments ran the gamut from what digital offerings are offered by school and public libraries, to what services students and patrons could use more of, to severely diminished library budgets and how libraries make the most of them.

Some interesting issues that were brought up were: the confusion among patrons as to what digital offerings and services are available from what libraries; whether students are interested in/use the digital offerings made available to them in school libraries; how much of library budgets go to digital services versus paper books and other materials; how Internet e- and audio-book borrowing works across library branches and system; and the tidbit that Australian/UK authors receive royalties each time a book is checked out.

Among some of the really informative links shared during the conversation were:

Below is the entire transcript of the chat. Thanks to everyone who joined in, especially Kathy and Shayera. Tune into Twitter again on Thursday, August 27th at 4pm EST for another #FollowReader TwitChat!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 518 other followers