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Archive for the ‘Reader Market Research’ Category

Thank you to the 1,200+ librarians who took our survey in December and January. I’m excited to share the results! This survey asked librarians about their adoption of digital reading devices, how they use digital galleys, and their primary sources for discovering new titles.

Take a look at the press release and check out the detailed results, below:

Results are based on a survey of 1,286 NetGalley librarian members and were collected from December 1, 2011 through February 7, 2012. 59% of librarians surveyed primarily use NetGalley to purchase new titles for their library, and the remainder use it to find new titles to recommend to patrons. Nearly 100 librarians wrote in to point out that they use NetGalley for both purposes.

*overlap occurs

*Publishers, remember that you can link to your title in the NetGalley catalog or allow auto-approval in any online advertising or marketing that you do!

**Publishers, this suggests that there’s a huge growth opportunity to pitch NetGalleys directly to librarians either through NetGalley’s marketing programs (NetGalley at the Library and Feed Your Reader), or using the widget in your own campaigns.

**Librarians, include your institutional email address in your NetGalley Contact Information and Public Bio so publishers know where to reach you!

*Publishers, don’t forget to add urls and use the Digital Press Kit to drive traffic to websites and direct readers to your marketing assets.

*ALA members, be sure you’ve added your ALA number to your NetGalley profile so publishers will see you’re part of the organization. More info is here.

A note on methods: The survey was open to NetGalley members and non-members alike, and was posted via Twitter (@NetGalley), Facebook.com/NetGalley, Direct Email, and re-posted by Library Journal. Results were collected between December 1, 2011 and February 7, 2012.

Thank you, also, to these librarians who had such wonderful things to say about NetGalley!

“I purchase 95 % of what I read on NetGalley. Great books.” –Kathy Spielman, Yorba Linda Middle School Library

“I use it to strengthen my case when recommending titles for purchase AND to look for books that would be good candidates for book clubs.” –Janet Lockhart, West Regional Library

“I use [NetGalley] for two purposes. As a librarian, I use it to find books and authors for the library collection. As a member of the New Mexico Library Association’s committee for our state children’s choice award, I use NetGalley to find exciting new books to nominate for the Land of Enchantment Book Award. We nominate about 30 titles per year, of which three are chosen for an award.” –Beth Nieman, Carlsbad Public Library

“It is so nice to be able to pick and choose the galleys I want to look at rather than getting a big old box, taking the two that I want, and having to dispose of the rest.”— Marea Black, Phoenix Public Library

“I use your emails religiously to find new and interesting titles to order, and recommend. I *love* getting emails about available titles and always look at the titles/publishers.”—Gina Robertson, Gardendale Public Library

“I love this service! It has really helped me decide what items to order in a time of financial problems.”—Jennifer Johnson-Spence, Cooke County Library

“[I] love being able to read books in advance and be able to talk about them with patrons when they come out. Also makes it easier to read new and different authors.”—Sharon A. Redfern , Rockville Public Library

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We must apologize for the absence of new posts over the last few months. As you may know if you’re a NetGalley member, your Digital Concierge (me, Lindsey) went on maternity leave earlier than expected in late November, and this blog went on leave right along with me! Luckily we found great help in Sarah, who served as your Digital Concierge while I was out. Now I’ve returned to my post at NetGalley and we’re ready to give you an update.

Here’s what NetGalley’s been up to over the past few months:

  • Finding new ways for you to read digital galleys. Thanks to the Aldiko Book Reader app, Android users can now read NetGalley files on their devices. Have questions about using your iPad, iPhone, Kobo, Literati, Nook, Sony Reader, or other device with NetGalley? There’s a page for that!
  • Telling you about new titles. Currently we have more than 940 titles listed in NetGalley’s public catalog, and new galleys are added all the time. We send out periodic updates about our new titles, so make sure you’re signed up to receive our newsletters for your favorite genres. Plus, you can now view past and forthcoming newsletters on our NetGalley Features page. We’ll soon be announcing the Most Requested titles, so check back to see if it’s your favorite!
  • Helping your requests get approved. We asked publishers what criteria they use to determine whether to approve or decline galley requests. Wondering what publishers are looking for? Check out this new page BEFORE you request to better your chances of getting the galleys you want.
  • Getting to know you — our members. We closed out 2010 with 15,353 registered members of NetGalley (today, just three months later, we’ve surpassed 20,000 members!), and we took some time to look at what that number means:
    • Reviewers – including bloggers – make up almost half of our members (49%). Another 16.5% are librarians, and 11% are part of the media. Booksellers make up an additional 11% of our member community, while educators accounted for 9.7%.
    • When new members join NetGalley, we ask them to indicate which genres they’re interested in. Literature & Fiction is the most popular, but only by a little bit – Teens & YA is close behind. Mystery & Thrillers, Science Fiction & Fantasy, and Romance are next, followed by Nonfiction.
    • NetGalley members made 80,945 requests to view galleys in 2010. It’s probably not too much of a surprise to say that reviewers made most of those requests – 63.9% of them, to be precise.
    • Our members downloaded 45,422 galleys last year. Almost half (46.9%) were DRM-protected files downloaded with Adobe Digital Editions. 29.1% were sent directly to members’ Kindles, and 11.2% were DRM-free files.
    • And the result of all of those readers, requests, and downloads was a mountain of reviews sent to publishers via NetGalley: 7972, to be precise. That’s a 17.6% return on approved galley requests.

So that’s the latest from the NetGalley world. I look forward to connecting with you!

Happy Reading,
Lindsey

Digital Concierge
NetGalley

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With all the focus on shiny (or, to be more accurate – black and white) devices this week, it’s easy to be distracted from the bigger picture goals for publishers: such as getting to know readers and what they really think about e-reading. In our small attempt to retrain the focus on what really matters, today’s #FollowReader will be all about – the reader! We have the great fortune to be joined by Kelly Gallagher of Bowker (@DiscoverBowker) who will preview some of the latest findings from the Book Industry Study Group’s ongoing consumer study, Consumer Attitudes Toward E-Book Reading and offer some insight about what’s going on beyond the hype of press releases and talk shows.

So, join us today at 4pm EDT for some fascinating conversation about book consumers’ actual interests in and preferences for digital content, and the factors that influence reading habits and purchasing decisions.

Kelly Gallagher of Bowker

About Kelly Gallagher
Kelly Gallagher is the Vice President of Publishing Services at RR Bowker. In this role he manages the implementation of a host of Bowker business intelligence and supply chain products including exclusive sales data reporting tools and EDI ordering for the Canadian, Higher Education, and US Christian markets. This business unit also manages a consumer research panel surveying over 36,000 consumers on media behaviors and purchase trends. Prior to joining Bowker, Kelly served as the Vice President of Business Development at the Christian Publishers Association for six years. In this role he managed the development and implementation of industry initiatives including research, technology and supply chain management. Kelly also serves the book publishing industry as the Research Chair for the Book Industry Study Group.

Helpful Hints for the #FTR uninitiated – To join the #followreader conversation today, here’s what to do:

  1. Just before 4pm ET today, log in to Twitter or whatever interface you prefer. (We recommend Tweetchat, which refreshes quickly and automatically loads your hashtag when you are in the discussion.)
  2. To follow the discussion, run a search for #followreader
  3. I’ll start by asking a few questions, before opening up the discussion to the group.
  4. To post a comment to the discussion, make sure that the hashtag #followreader is in each tweet you write.

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While the paper versus plastic battle continues to wage between purists from both sides, a newer, and more complex “discussion” seems to be rearing its hydra-like head lately: What is the right way to read e? This question/argument has also been phrased as, “what is the right way to “publish” (design, format, distribute) e-content?

Truth is (Kat’s truth, anyways), just as in the paper v. plastic kerfuffle, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to the “best ebook reading experience” debate. Some folks roll like Dragnet: they want “just the text, ma’am.” Give them a scrollable, legible font, in a clean and easy-to-use format, and they’re in ebook nirvana.

Some people want bells and whistles and interactive experiences.  For these folks, incorporating gaming, and videos and social sharing into the e-reading experience goes without saying. You can have it all, so why wouldn’t you?

And, then there are a growing number of hep cats that want to replicate the booky-book experience digitally. Their holy ereading grail is a digital book read that immerses them in the psychological/emotional equivalent of a physical book read.

Of course, sometimes some of these people swap allegiances – the straight text Dragnet types will get suckered in by the offer of a free enhanced book app; or the have-it-all bells and whistles ereading folks will find themselves enjoying the relative calm of a no-distractions read — demonstrating once again, that the future of reading isn’t just about digital, and the future of digital isn’t just about one kind of digital. We are vast. We contain bookish multitudes.

All of this being a long way round to the introduction of tomorrow’s #FollowReader discussion topic: What does ereading done right mean to you (or, as a publisher, what does epublishing right mean to you)? Are you a fan of one particluar style of ebook? Are you promiscuous when it comes to your ereading habits? Would you rather gouge out your eyes than trade your Kindle in for an iPad?  Well, we want to know!

@EdNawotka

By we, I mean me and our special super wonderful guest for the hour, Publishing Perspective‘s Ed Nawotka, and all the other friendly folks who participate in #FollowReader.

So, join us on Twitter tomorrow (THURSDAY JULY 1) at 4pm EDT sharp for an online talk about what it means to read e.

Almost All About Ed

Ed Nawotka is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Publishing Perspectives, an online magazine for the international publishing industry that has been called “the BBC of the book world.”

Prior to launching Publishing Perspectives, he worked as book columnist for Bloomberg News and daily news editor of Publishers Weekly.

He has also served as the literary director of the Texas Book Festival, a judge for various book awards, and has worked as a foreign correspondent, a bookseller, literary magazine editor and advertising copywriter.

As a journalist he has reported from more than 30 countries. He continues to be a widely published freelance writer, with his work regularly appearing in publications across the United States, as well as overseas.

Ed’s reviews, essays and reporting have appeared in The New Yorker, The International Herald Tribune, The Guardian, Travel + Leisure, Los Angeles Times, Budget Travel, New Statesman, USA Today, and People, among others.

He has appeared as a guest on various television and radio programs, including those on NPR, PRI, BBC, and C-SPAN, and has lectured at numerous universities and institutions.

You can find him on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Or write to him directly.

Helpful Hints for the #FTR uninitiated – To join the #followreader conversation on Thursday, here’s what to do:

  1. Just before 4pm ET today, log in to Twitter or whatever interface you prefer. (We recommend Tweetchat, which refreshes quickly and automatically loads your hashtag when you are in the discussion.)
  2. To follow the discussion, run a search for #followreader
  3. I’ll start by asking a few questions, before opening up the discussion to the group.
  4. To post a comment to the discussion, make sure that the hashtag #followreader is in each tweet you write.

Looking forward to chatting with you!

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We interrupt this public service blog for an announcement from our sponsor, NetGalley…

When I recently announced that NetGalley had reached the milestone of 5,000 registered members, I promised more info about our community of professional readers – who they are, how they read, etc. The data below was drawn from internal statistics on our site as well as a recent online survey answered by over 655 NetGalley members.

Who they are

As you might expect, the biggest community using NetGalley is reviewers – including bloggers and print reviewers – making up about 50% of total registered members. The remaining 50% is a mix of librarians, booksellers, educators, and media.

How they read

Though nostalgia for printed books and galleys remains high on blogs, twitter discussions and in other venues, our members are inclined to read digitally if it means faster access to new titles. A whopping 71% see “quick access to new galleys” as the biggest draw to digital galleys. And well over three-quarters of the respondents will read either print or digital galleys, with only 12% responding “I will only read print galleys.”

Also mirroring wider trends in reading devices, just over 60% read galleys by downloading them to their computer. As for dedicated reading devices, Amazon’s Kindle was the winner at 16%. The Sony Reader was next in line at 12%, with Barnes & Noble’s new Nook at only 5%.

NOTE: We conducted our survey before the iPad hit stores. In addition, the iPad currently does not support DRM-ed (protected) files – so the only galleys from NetGalley that can be read on that device are galleys that the publishers are offering as DRM-free (open) files. To date, the majority of galleys offered on NetGalley come with DRM; logically, since most publishers do not want pre-pub files distributed. More on this topic in a later post.

Why they like digital galleys

After quick access to new galleys, our members appreciate digital galleys for what they can provide that print galleys can’t: mainly,

  • Being able to “read on the go” (49%)
  • Searchability inside the galley (34%)
  • Full-color reading and images (25%)

In the age of immediacy, when news becomes old before it even makes it to print (thanks, Twitter!), being able to email a direct link to a digital galley is a pretty awesome tool in the publicist’s tool belt.

It also makes sense that the ease of skimming and searching digital galleys makes them attractive to professional readers who may not need to read the entire text – like TV/radio producers looking for experts and journalists writing off-the-book-page-features.

In addition, most professional readers don’t have early access to four-color pre-pub materials for illustrated and graphic-heavy books (like cookbooks, children’s titles, etc) – meaning that professional readers might not otherwise see these titles (or only see a few pages in BLADs) before they arrive in stores.

A Book Critic’s View

During a recent chat with book critic Bethanne Patrick (the host of WETA.org’s Book Studio, who we’ve interviewed in the past, known to her fellow tweeters as @TheBookMaven), I got a few more insights on the advantages of digital galleys. Bethanne said she loves how digital galleys allow her to preview a book, to see if she’d even want the printed galley. When bookshelf space is at a premium for reviewers, she appreciates getting an email from a publicist with a link to the digital galley that says “take a look and let me know if you want a printed galley.”

Bethanne also sees value in the one-stop-shopping aspect of NetGalley:

  • When she decides she wants a printed galley after viewing the digital version, she can just hit the EMAIL PUBLISHER button right in the title record in NetGalley.
  • She can also access the Digital Press Kit materials – where publishers can include the press release, tour schedule, author Q&A, audio/video clips, cover images, etc.
  • By sending her reviews to publishers via NetGalley, she hopes to appease publicists who still ask for tear-sheets of reviews.

Finally, Bethanne added that even when she had read an entire galley in printed form, she still liked to have a digital copy while writing her review. That way, she could quickly find a certain page or passage in a window alongside her review, without having to take off/put on her glasses while switching from the printed page to her computer screen. It’s the little things, right?

I’m excited that support of digital galleys is growing and—best of all—publishers and readers alike are finding new ways and reasons to appreciate the format.

As always, I’m open to any and all feedback – we love hearing from you!

All best,

Lindsey Rudnickas

your friendly Digital Concierge at NetGalley

Follow me on Twitter: @NetGalley

Become a fan of our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NetGalley

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We interrupt this public service blog for an announcement from our sponsor, NetGalley…

As any of our loyal NetGalley members know, we recently had a makeover in some key areas of www.netgalley.com. Around the same time, we asked our members to take a short survey to get some feedback about how they were reading galleys and how we could better serve them. I thought it’d be fun to share some of our findings – and perhaps even start a larger conversation about these hot topics. While this post will focus mostly on the NetGalley side of things, stay tuned for a related post about overall trends.

We were psyched when what we lovingly-named our “Reader Release” went live. Stemming directly from feedback from our members (“professional readers” made up of reviewers, media professionals, bloggers, librarians, booksellers, and educators), we worked hard to make it easier to find and request galleys.

That meant a catalog revamp – not just a fresh overall look, but also a bunch of exciting changes, including…

See more about each title:
•    Now ISBN and Genre show in the main catalog view

Browse instantly in several ways:
•    Browse by Titles Recently Added
•    Browse by Publisher
and best of all…
•    Browse by Genre (This change was greeted very warmly, indeed!)

Narrow down with Sorting and Searching:
•    Sort by Date Added, Most Requested, Title, Publisher, Imprint, Author, and Pub Date
•    Search by Author, Title, Imprint, Publisher, and Genre


My favorite one of these is the Most Requested sort. How cool that I can see (and you can see too!) the…

Top 10 Most Requested Titles on NetGalley (as of today):
1. The Iron Daughter (Harlequin)
2. The Handbook for Lightning Strike Survivors (The Crown Publishing Group)
3. My Soul to Keep (Harlequin)
4. The Oracle of Dating (Harlequin)
5. The Case for Books (PublicAffairs)
6. Chasing Perfect (Harlequin)
7. Manifest (Harlequin)
8. The Clearing (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
9. What’s New, Cupcake? (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
10. BOOK: THE SEQUEL (PublicAffairs)

But, we couldn’t just stop at the catalog. Our homepage got a facelift, too – with new navigation so readers can easily find the information they seek, as well as a special “What’s New at NetGalley” area. Personally, I’m a big fan of the sleek buttons we added, too.

Lastly, we updated our QUICK BROWSE reading option. Our new online viewer includes some great benefits, including easier page-turning and ZOOM!

Oh, and one more cool thing: we added a SHARE button to our Buzz Page – so now you can tell others which titles spark your interest. Post it on Twitter, Facebook, and a ton of other places — just roll your cursor over the word “share” to see all the different options.

My favorite is how now you can EMAIL IT TO A FRIEND with the envelope icon.

Lastly, I’m proud to announce that we’ve reached the milestone of 5,000 registered members! That includes: publishers, traditional book reviewers, media professionals (radio/tv producers, journalists, etc), booksellers, bloggers, librarians, and educators (for exam/desk copies).

More to come in my next post about our member community – who they are and how they read – and I look forward to a larger dialogue about overall e-reading trends!

As always, I’m open to any and all feedback – we love hearing from you :)

All best,

Lindsey Rudnickas

your friendly Digital Concierge at NetGalley

Follow me on Twitter: @NetGalley

Become a fan of our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NetGalley

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I was speaking with a publisher yesterday who is all excited about plans to include book club guides in many of their forthcoming books.  Yes, book club guides sound like a nice idea, but the excitement she was expressing over the prospect kind of threw me for a loop. Reading guides?  Surely this is not something to get excited about.

A little more discussion proved that I am wrong. Reading guides are hot – largely because book clubs are very hot, and publishers are excited about any way they can think of to make a title a more likely prospect for a book club pick.

Further proof of the book club renaissance — I only recently noticed libraries stocking “Book Club Kits” — multiple copies of a book which can be checked out by a single member for an entire book club, along with discussion questions and background information on the author.  Apparently, libraries have been making such kits available for a while now, but lately — libraries who have these kits can’t keep up with the demand.

Another indication? I recently got an email from Peter, a fellow who runs Flashlight Worthy Book Recommendations. Apparently he’s looking to expand his offerings of book club books. Why? Well, the book club community has recently discovered FlashLight Worthy’s book club lists, love them – and are clamoring for more.

What’s the reason for this renewed interest in, and popularity of book clubs ? Perhaps it’s because there seems to be a book club for everyone, and they are taking place in all kinds of forms. Some book club members are finding one another, and conducting discussions online. Others are holding on-site book club meetings during lunch breaks at work. There are Twitter book clubs (e.g.:TwitterBookClub; Picador Book Club, JBC Twitter Book Club); book clubs for mothers and  daughters; and even Twitter Book Clubs just for Moms.

Will the increasing prevalence of e-reading devices and social software make book clubs even more popular? Lots of e-book book clubs are already in existence, and with online book and reading communities like BookGlutton, book club members don’t even need to meet at the same time, much less the same place.

We’d love to hear from you — are you in a book club? Is it an “In Real Life” book club, or a virtual one? How did your book club form? What unites the members of your club – genre, relationships, geography? What do you love most about your book club? Why do you think book clubs are enjoying new found popularity?

Let us know in the comments below, and who knows? We just might be doing a #FollowReader discussion on the book club renaissance in the near future.

Oh, and if you have any suggestions for new book club lists for Flashlight Worthy, please contact Peter: info@flashlightworthy.com.

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