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Archive for the ‘ALA’ Category

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so we’re borrowing the concept of Armchair BEA for this Armchair ALA post!

NetGalley loves librarians, and we’re grateful for the support you’ve shown us! Our librarian membership has grown significantly over the past year, and now is the second largest segment of our community (after reviewers/bloggers). Earlier this year we conducted a survey of the librarians using NetGalley, and found some interesting stats.

Our NetGalley at the Library initiative began following our partnership with the American Library Association. If you’re an ALA member, be sure to include your ALA number in your NetGalley profile (My Profile/Account Information) so publishers will see the ALA icon appear when you request titles. Publishers have told us that librarians with that ALA icon are approved more quickly and often. And be sure to sign up for our NetGalley at the Library newsletters here!

We’re also so excited to be working with EarlyWord and Penguin on First Flights: The Penguin Debut Author Program. There’s still time to join and get a copy of City of Women by David R. Gillham from NetGalley!

But now onto ALA Annual. This year, we’re sad to not be attending the show ourselves, and figured some of you librarians might be feeling the same. We’re hoping this Armchair ALA post will serve as a connection point between those of us at home and those of you at the show. So, spread the word via Twitter (#ArmchairALA), and for those of you lucky librarians who are in Anaheim, share the wealth and give us the inside scoop in the Comments section below! Which authors did you meet, which publishers had the best giveaways or beautiful booths, and what titles are you most excited about?

We’ve compiled a list of titles you won’t want to miss–either at the show or from the comfort of your own chairs courtesy of NetGalley.

Click to view our NetGalley Roundup: ALA Annual Preview Edition!

Have you seen Library Journal‘s exclusive 2012 ALA Galley & Signing Guide from PrePub Alert editor Barbara Hoffert? The guide notes whether titles listed are available via NetGalley. Sign up now, and as soon as it’s published, you’ll receive an email containing LJ’s insider’s guide to the most promising new titles coming to ALA Annual in Anaheim. Don’t miss out on this essential roadmap helping library professionals navigate the biggest show of the year! Plus, you’ll see embedded icons that will guide you to NetGalleyso you can request a copy even if you won’t be at the show.

Happy reading,

Lindsey

Digital Concierge, NetGalley

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We’re excited to announce “Librarian Voices” — a new feature as part of our NetGalley at the Library initiative!

This first “Librarian Voices” post is by Marlene Harris of Reading Reality. Enjoy!
Marlene Harris Librarian Voices

Notable Books and Advance Galleys: It’s so much fun to say “We knew you when”

It can be fun to look at someone famous and say “I knew you when…”, particularly when that “someone” is a book, and the “when” in question is waaaay back before that book came out, and no one knew the book was going to be as hot as it turned out to be.

Or when you’re looking at the ALA Notable List, and remembering when you picked up the ARC at a conference, or got the egalley from NetGalley, because you thought it might be good, and, lo and behold, there it is, an award-winner.

Sometimes, you read a book, and you know it’s special. Then you tell everyone you know until they’re sick of it, and you. Unless you’re very lucky, and it’s your job to help people find their next perfect read.

The ALA Notable Books List is always interesting and useful, because as soon as I see it, I look at it and go, “oh, that one was popular”, “oh, that’s an interesting choice”, or “mmm, I can see why that got picked.” In collection development, it always made for a list of titles to check, but they were usually ones the library already owned. We’d miss one sometimes, especially on the poetry portion of the list!

Maybe it’s because I’m  personally a genre fiction reader, but the ALA Notable Books List always seemed like the “big books” list, Not big in the sense that they’re long books, but big in the sense that they’re literary, at least on the fiction side. These are “important” books, even when they are also very, very popular. Tea Obreht’s  The Tiger’s Wife was one book that we just couldn’t get copies of fast enough. I remember seeing it in NetGalley before the pub date, and I wish I had snagged it then! Then I would have known in advance it was going to be big!

There’s another ALA list, one that reflects what people read for pleasure, instead of the important books. It’s The Reading List that RUSA CODES publishes. This list has categories for genres like “Science Fiction” and “Mystery” and “Romance”, you know, the good stuff. (I’ve never been so sure about that “Adrenaline” category.)

Genre fiction sells, and genre fiction circulates. That’s what circulation statistics show, and publishing numbers and everything else. The books on this list are the ones that people will enjoy.

And they’re fun.

The trick for librarians is picking out which one, or ten, are going to stand out from the crowd. It’s hard because the genre field is crowded and very diverse. Each genre can feel like its own little planet, and the galaxies can seem light-years apart. Lists like this are great navigational tools.

Each title on the fantasy list this year is absolutely marvelous. One of my favorite books of the year, The Magician King by Lev Grossman, is on the short list. The short list! It’s not even the winner! I knew when opened the first page of that egalley from NetGalley that it was going to be one of the big books of the year. But as far the winning title is concerned, as soon as I saw the NetGalley description for this title, it was clear that Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus was something special.  The circus arrives and it brings magic.

On the 2012 list, one of the shortlisted titles in the romance category is Kristan Higgins’ My One and Only. I resisted the impulse to get an egalley last year, but Higgins new book, Somebody to Love, is available now. And I have an egalley from NetGalley.

Maybe Somebody to Love will be on the RUSA CODES Reading List in 2013. And I’ll be able to say that “I knew it when…”

Marlene’s library credentials include an MLS from the University of Kentucky (Go Wildcats!) and over 20 years experience in collection development in public and academic libraries around the U.S; from Chicago to Alaska to Florida. For the past year Marlene has been a consultant and blogger at Reading Reality, where she reviews all the genre fiction she can find, and advocates for ebooks only publishing through her Ebook Review Central feature every Monday. Carina and Dreamspinner, two NetGalley clients, are among the regularly featured publishers. Marlene is also a reviewer for Library Journal.

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Thank you to the 1,200+ librarians who took our survey in December and January. I’m excited to share the results! This survey asked librarians about their adoption of digital reading devices, how they use digital galleys, and their primary sources for discovering new titles.

Take a look at the press release and check out the detailed results, below:

Results are based on a survey of 1,286 NetGalley librarian members and were collected from December 1, 2011 through February 7, 2012. 59% of librarians surveyed primarily use NetGalley to purchase new titles for their library, and the remainder use it to find new titles to recommend to patrons. Nearly 100 librarians wrote in to point out that they use NetGalley for both purposes.

*overlap occurs

*Publishers, remember that you can link to your title in the NetGalley catalog or allow auto-approval in any online advertising or marketing that you do!

**Publishers, this suggests that there’s a huge growth opportunity to pitch NetGalleys directly to librarians either through NetGalley’s marketing programs (NetGalley at the Library and Feed Your Reader), or using the widget in your own campaigns.

**Librarians, include your institutional email address in your NetGalley Contact Information and Public Bio so publishers know where to reach you!

*Publishers, don’t forget to add urls and use the Digital Press Kit to drive traffic to websites and direct readers to your marketing assets.

*ALA members, be sure you’ve added your ALA number to your NetGalley profile so publishers will see you’re part of the organization. More info is here.

A note on methods: The survey was open to NetGalley members and non-members alike, and was posted via Twitter (@NetGalley), Facebook.com/NetGalley, Direct Email, and re-posted by Library Journal. Results were collected between December 1, 2011 and February 7, 2012.

Thank you, also, to these librarians who had such wonderful things to say about NetGalley!

“I purchase 95 % of what I read on NetGalley. Great books.” –Kathy Spielman, Yorba Linda Middle School Library

“I use it to strengthen my case when recommending titles for purchase AND to look for books that would be good candidates for book clubs.” –Janet Lockhart, West Regional Library

“I use [NetGalley] for two purposes. As a librarian, I use it to find books and authors for the library collection. As a member of the New Mexico Library Association’s committee for our state children’s choice award, I use NetGalley to find exciting new books to nominate for the Land of Enchantment Book Award. We nominate about 30 titles per year, of which three are chosen for an award.” –Beth Nieman, Carlsbad Public Library

“It is so nice to be able to pick and choose the galleys I want to look at rather than getting a big old box, taking the two that I want, and having to dispose of the rest.”— Marea Black, Phoenix Public Library

“I use your emails religiously to find new and interesting titles to order, and recommend. I *love* getting emails about available titles and always look at the titles/publishers.”—Gina Robertson, Gardendale Public Library

“I love this service! It has really helped me decide what items to order in a time of financial problems.”—Jennifer Johnson-Spence, Cooke County Library

“[I] love being able to read books in advance and be able to talk about them with patrons when they come out. Also makes it easier to read new and different authors.”—Sharon A. Redfern , Rockville Public Library

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The holiday rush is behind us, it’s still frigid outside, and librarians everywhere are starting to get excited. . . it’s that time of year again: Midwinter. The 2012 ALA Midwinter conference is being held in Dallas this year (January 20-24) and I’m thrilled to be going—it’s also a return to my Texas roots!

In preparation for Midwinter, we at NetGalley have been busy little bees working to enhance our service for librarians. I’m most excited to share the news that NetGalley has partnered with the ALA! If you have an ALA number, add it to your NetGalley account by logging in, clicking on My Profile, and then Account Information. Once you add your number, publishers can easily identify you as an ALA member and we anticipate your requests will be approved faster and more frequently. Some publishers have already told us they plan to auto-approve all ALA members for their galleys going forward!

We’re also starting a new newsletter and social media program aimed just at librarians! “NetGalley at the Library” newsletters will be sent out monthly and feature titles and promotions from various publishers. Don’t miss out—be sure you sign up to receive these and other newsletters here.

Nearly 1,000 of our librarian members have already taken our survey, which is great! But we still want to hear from YOU. If you’re a member and haven’t already taken the survey, please follow this link to do so. It should only take you about five minutes to complete. If you’re NOT a NetGalley member, or know someone who’s not a member, we have a whole separate survey for you to take. The surveys will close after Midwinter on 1/27/2012. Our intent is to discover more about how NetGalley librarian-members use the site and what aspects you find most useful. We will share the general results with publishers so they have some feedback from the librarian community on NetGalley.

Lastly, I just want to remind you that the ALA Midwinter website has a lot of really great tools for anyone attending the conference. Check out the scheduler and the exhibitor list, and find hotel and travel information. I’ll be roaming the exhibit hall on Saturday and Sunday with an “I Love NetGalley” sticker on, meeting with publishers and hopefully speaking with some of you librarians! If you spot me, please stop me to say hello—I’ll save a sticker for you, too.

 

Happy travels to Dallas,

Kristina, Community Concierge

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